Biblical Herbs and Treatments (Hyssop)

Hyssop (Aka Hyssopus officinalis):

Psalms 51:7 – Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean: wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.

Hyssop is used for digestive and intestinal problems including liver and gallbladder conditions, intestinal pain, intestinal gas, colic, and loss of appetite. It is also used for respiratory problems including coughs, the common cold, respiratory infections, sore throat, and asthma.

Other uses include urinary tract infection (UTI), poor circulation, HIV/AIDS, and menstrual cramps.

Some people use hyssop as a gargle; in baths to cause sweating; and on the skin for treating skin irritations, burns, bruises, and frostbite.

In foods, hyssop oil and extract are used as a flavoring.

In manufacturing, hyssop oil is used as a fragrance in soaps and cosmetics.

Courtesy of WebMD!

How to use:

Make a Tea

Hyssop leaves have been used for centuries in teas. Hyssop tea has a lot of antibiotic properties which are produced from the leaves it’s made from, so drinking it may be a sure way to slow down and stop the growths of harmful bacteria in the body. The flavonoids present in it also have many antibiotic qualities to it which make it useful in helping to treat internal infections in the body such as throat and nasal infections.

Make a Tincture:

Hyssop can be used for colds and flu’s. Hyssop is an expectorant so it will relieve congestion. Take 2 teaspoons twice a day.

Make your own essential Oil:

Hyssop  has proven itself as a beneficial antiseptic since it has the ability to help heal cuts and bruises when applied topically. Its antibacterial properties can also help prevent any open wounds from getting infected. This property also makes it useful in treating certain types of fungus on the skin as well. Some also claim that regular usage can reduce the appearance of wrinkles and offer relief for pain and swelling.

How to Grow Hyssop:

Hyssop can be started in containers, indoors or outdoors.  If you plant in a container make sure the pot is deep enough to accommodate a large root system. Sow seeds indoors or directly in the garden in early spring. Hyssop prefers full sun to partial shade with a well drained, even dry, soil.  You can amend soil with organic matter. Sow seeds just beneath the surface, approximately ¼-inch deep.  Germination generally takes between 14 and 21 days, but can take as long as a month, so be patient.  Transplant if sown indoors after all threat of frost has passed.  Space between 6 inches and 12 inches apart.

Did you know?

On the cross Jesus was given a mixture of gall extended with a hyssop branch.

Hope this helps. Until Later your friend Bill

 

 

 

Advertisements

Published by

Bill Silbaugh

I have always used alternative medicines and have recently started learning and using essential oils. I am trying to change the health of the world one person at a time.

7 thoughts on “Biblical Herbs and Treatments (Hyssop)”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s